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Do you need to be smarter than your student to help with homework?

Joanna Veeremaa

Joanna is a recent graduate of Tallinn University’s Baltic Film, Media, Arts and Communication School. She was a Managing Editor for an Estonian magazine and has written editorials for several publications. Today she is discovering the world of communications at the European Youth Forum.


By Scott Groza

The subject of homework has become a controversial subject over the past few years. The overwhelming majority of schools still issue homework to their students, but more and more experts are questioning whether or not it does any good. Kids already spend a large part of their day in school learning. Does sending students home with a ton of extra work help them or do they need a break? And what does a parent do when their child receives homework in a subject they arenai??i??t up-to-date on?

The constant upgrading of materials and curriculums can be one of the causes. This change was seen the most when it came to the use of common-core math, in which most adults did not grow up learning. So what do you do when theyai??i??re having some difficulty? Can you really help your child with their homework if you donai??i??t grasp the subject theyai??i??re learning?

The answer is yes!

Thereai??i??s a lot more to homework time than just sitting down and pounding out problems. To a lot of kids (and adults alike), homework is a giant waste of time. Its stressful but just having someone there to help and encourage them can take a lot of that stress away. The smoother the process, the less time they will have to spend on it.

Another way to stay ahead of the curve is to know your kidai??i??s teacher(s). Attend the parent-teacher conferences. Most teachers have a list of materials and a syllabus that outlines exactly what they will be covering throughout the semester. You can be proactive and look over their lessons ahead of time. If you know one area might give you trouble, you can consider tutoring or ask a friend/family member to step in for you. You can even decide to learn for yourself so youai??i??re ready when the time comes.

Homework Organisation

One great way to help your child study successfully is by providing them with a bit of structure to the homework schedule. Do you want them to finish their work as soon as they get home? Maybe after dinner? Before going to sleep? Whatever you decide, stick to it. Provide a distraction-free area of the house – turn off the TV, have snacks ready and sit down together at the same time every day to get the work over with.

Kids also learn to follow your example. Maybe while theyai??i??re doing their work, you do yours. Read a book while they have to read for class. When they do math, sit down and balance the budget. Doing similar work at the same time keeps students from being distracted. Imagine how tough it would be to concentrate on your studies if everyone is in the living room having a good time or if you have loud music playing.

In the end, it is up to your child to know how to do the extra work. Motivate them. Encourage good work. Donai??i??t be afraid to get extra help if this extra effort doesnai??i??t translate into good grades. Students learn at different paces, so you may need to discover a new way of learning thatai??i??s beneficial.

Joanna Veeremaa

Joanna is a recent graduate of Tallinn University’s Baltic Film, Media, Arts and Communication School. She was a Managing Editor for an Estonian magazine and has written editorials for several publications. Today she is discovering the world of communications at the European Youth Forum.

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