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Post-Erasmus depression: Help, Iai??i??m going back home!

Marion Duboquet

Marion is a journalist from Lille, France. From 2010 to 2014, she hosted the radio shows Culture Pop and Road Trip on RPL99FM. In 2013, she participated in the REC project (European Citizen Radio) in Jena (Germany) and Tamasi (Hungary). After living in Hungary for two years and writing for Le Petit Journal de Budapest, she moved to Frankfurt and is now a correspondent for YO! Mag.


To prepare yourself for a departure abroad, whether as a student, a trainee or an employee, you can find tons of articles on the topic, but what about the return? There the documentation is missing, however it is equally important to prepare for it.

 

“Once back home I felt totally depressed. Not only could I not find job, but absolutely nothing had changed during these months when I was living a fabulous experience,”Ai??says Ana (who wished to remain anonymous) when remembering her return to Croatia after a traineeship of several months in Vienna.

This depression phenomenon, which can follow an experience abroad, is what Fiorella de Nicola calls the post-Erasmus syndrome neurontin reviews, dapoxetine reviews. . She even devoted a thesis on the topic that was published in 2004, followed by a book: Erasmusai??i??s Anthropology.Ai??

In her book she explains that when abroad the students donai??i??t realise yet that once back home their house will seem very ugly, their city very cold (or unbearably hot), university very boring, TV very dodgy, their friends rubbish (ai??i??). They will reject everything that is not Erasmus. They all experiment the syndrome although with a different intensity and length.”

Indeed, for some the depression tends to lessen after a few weeks and habits come back to the fore. For others, another syndrome replaces the first one: the travellerai??i??s syndrome that incites them to leave again and again.

After several months or years spent abroad, the travellers may end up feeling stateless, or rather both from their hometown and from this new home that welcomed them for a while. This duality is not always easy to deal with, all the more if one adds to it the boredom that may accompany the return after months of constant novelty and fascinating encounters.

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For workers who chose to try the adventure abroad, the return may turn out to be even more difficult, this time not only from a psychological point of view, but also from an administrative one.

If badly prepared or badly informed, when one returns the consequences may turn out to be quite serious. This is what Marie explains us, after working for two years in Budapest she chose to go back to France, her native country.

“At PA?le Emploi (Public Employment Service in France) they asked me for U2 forms I had never heard about in order to have access to unemployment benefits. Of course I had attestations of employment that my employers in Budapest have given me but they were written in Hungarian and without any official European form these documents were null and void.”

The only solution in that case would have been for Marie to go back to Budapest to ask for these documents or to contact the Hungarian employment office. She went for the second option but never got any answer from them. She preferred to work abroad again, this time ensuring that she would get the right documents to ease a possible return to France.

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“Backpacker” by Antoine K (Creative Commons)

 

Return, instruction manual

It is indeed crucial to get information beforehand in your country of origin on the return conditions that apply after having worked abroad. Which documents will you need? Will you have access to unemployment benefits? In the case of France for example, all the information is available on the website of CLEISS (Centre of European and international liaisons for social security).

In the context of a traineeship, you have to make sure that you have all the contracts so that the experience can be an asset to point out on your CV. Donai??i??t hesitate either to ask your employer to write a reference letter or a report of your stay ai??i?? preferably in English ai??i?? if not already included in your traineeship report.

When it comes to the post-Erasmus depression Fiorella de Nicola mentions, soon it will be described as a real generational phenomenon because the Erasmus programme is so attractive to Europeai??i??s young people. According to the latest statistics by the European Commission, about 270,000 students will have benefited from European Union grants to study or attend a training course abroad in 2012-2013.

Today, Ana, the Croatian trainee is smiling again: “This period was difficult and lasted several months before I got my head together and realised that if I could not find a job at home, nothing prevented me from travelling again, and not necessarily abroad. I am now working for a cultural association in Zagreb and I regularly apply to European projects or workshops abroad. It enables me to travel for some days and to continue meeting young people from all over the world.”

 

Header image: “Europe” by Charles Clegg (Creative Commons) recommend sites to buy viagra buy Apcalis SX online cheap, generic dapoxetine. .

Marion Duboquet

Marion is a journalist from Lille, France. From 2010 to 2014, she hosted the radio shows Culture Pop and Road Trip on RPL99FM. In 2013, she participated in the REC project (European Citizen Radio) in Jena (Germany) and Tamasi (Hungary). After living in Hungary for two years and writing for Le Petit Journal de Budapest, she moved to Frankfurt and is now a correspondent for YO! Mag.

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