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Youth unemployment statistics

Narek Mirzoyan

Narek Mirzoyan is from Armenia. He has a Master's degree in Economics. Narek participates actively in trainings and seminars on topics such as migration, conflict transformation, social democracy, peace building, public health, journalism, human rights, etc. His hobbies are travelling, reading, music, cartoons. He enjoys making wine by himself and hopes to own a winery in the future.


Youth unemployment rates are generally much higher than unemployment for all ages. There are many reasons behind this: the economic crisis, lack of work experience and qualifications, lack of access to capital, no real regulation and assistance by governments etc., The consequences of youth unemployment definitely have a negative effect, not only on the future employability of young people, but also on their self-esteem and on their role in the community. Beyond that, youth unemployment can have consequences such as increasing the risk of poverty, de-skilling, social exclusion, loss of motivation, mental health problems, lower wages, worse career opportunities, economic and cultural isolation and, finally, increase in drug and alcohol use higher levels of crime.

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As can be seen from the graph, the lowest unemployment rate in the European Union is in Germany, whilst the highest is in Greece. It is worth mentioning that the youth unemployment rate in Germany decreased to 6.9 percent in August from 7 percent in July of 2016. It was as its lowest level since October 1992.

These statistics show that Sweden, with a youth unemployment rate fo around 20%, is around the mean, with Luxembourg and Latvia representing the median (the middle of the range) at 17.25% and Austria, Czech Republic and Denmark have similar youth unemployment rates.

When I was a fresh graduate with lacking experience (I had two years of military service, but it was not considered as a working experience) I had a strong wish and desire to put my knowledge and capabilities into the working field because I devoted 6 years of my life to studying economics. The essential points of my CV were the followings:

The job-searching period for me became considerably longer than I could imagine. Surely, experienced workers find jobs easier than inexperienced ones. Young people struggling to find permanent jobs are bound to accept temporary and intern positions: I was not an exception. I was a volunteer in a business company as a business analyst for two months, after that I was a trainee in a telecommunication organisation for one month, then I became an intern for a newspaper as an article writer for one month. However, these experiences are not always considered by employers as ai???realai??? work experience. Bearing this in mind, I tried to participate in training sessions and courses hoping that these programs would help me to find a job. For example, I took part in courses and trainings such as HR management, accounting, finance and banking, behavioural economics, social media management, etc. But again, those programs did not help me, and having them on my CV did not ease the process of finding work.

Of course, unemployment among young people can also lead to reduced level of happiness and mental health issues. In my case, in my failure to find a job, I was desperate and unhappy and sometimes I even suffered from depression. Fortunately, some time later I became psychologically more strong and balanced that after the failures in finding a job I have not been sad and have not had any further depression. This brings to mind a well known saying ai???Bad times sometimes give excellent chancesai???.

My experience highlights one of the most essential characteristics of youth unemployment: the lack of work experience. Nowadays, many organisations require 3-5 years working experience for a particular job and, therefore, they eliminate youth from the range of potential workers. On the contrary, they should promote youth to work for them as they are enthusiastic and eager to work after university, they can bring new ideas and policies to an organisation. I wonder if the organisations do not give a chance for youth to work, from where they will get that experience? I remember there was a time in my life when I was looking for a job in international organisations, such as the COE (Council of Europe Office in Yerevan, Armenia), EU (delegation of the European Union to Armenia), IOM (Representation of the International Organisation for Migration in Armenia), OSCE (Office of the Organisation for Security and Cooperation In Europe), UNDP (United Nations Development Program in Armenia) etc, however, all these organisations required at least 5 yearsai??i?? work experience from which I can assume that they do not have young workers.

Job-hunting can lead to gaps in employment history, loss of skills and productivity and, finally, it can harm future work prospects, which not only brings personal struggles, but impacts on society and threatens the economic welfare of any country. Thatai??i??s why, young people should be properly integrated in the labour market. donde puedo comprar mebendazole paroxetine online, dapoxetine without prescription. acquire sildenafil, acquire zithromax. .

Narek Mirzoyan

Narek Mirzoyan is from Armenia. He has a Master's degree in Economics. Narek participates actively in trainings and seminars on topics such as migration, conflict transformation, social democracy, peace building, public health, journalism, human rights, etc. His hobbies are travelling, reading, music, cartoons. He enjoys making wine by himself and hopes to own a winery in the future.

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